J32

History | Performance | Cost of Ops

The British Aerospace Jetstream 32 represents further development and improvements to the J31 aircraft.  With  grew out of an original design of Handley Page. British Aerospace achieved certification in 1982 and produced a total of 226 J31s though the 1980s. The aircraft has been operated in the U.S. by Pan American World Airways, Trans State Airlines, Express I Airlines as well as Atlantic Coast Airlines. It remains in use in a number of Charter and Regional airlines around the world.

Powered by Garrett TPE-331-20 engines, the J31 has a max takeoff weight of 15,212 and a useful load of 4,500 lbs. The aircraft has two baggage storage areas, an aft baggage compartment which can carry 628 lbs. and a ventral pod which can carry 435 lbs.

The J31 can carry 3,100 lbs. of fuel, burning 800 lbs. of fuel its first hour of flight and then 600 lbs per hour. Its full range (carrying 1500lbs) is 800 miles. It is best suited to short-haul legs at low field elevations (below 4000 ft MSL).

     
     


Recent Jetstream 32 Posts


BAE tests UAV auto-control system on Jetstream!

Posted by on Nov 27, 2012 in Jetstream 31, Jetstream 32 | 0 comments

BAE tests UAV auto-control system on Jetstream!

BAE Systems tests UAV auto-control system on Jetstream BAE Systems is flying a modified Jetstream regional turboprop to test automatic flight control systems for unmanned air vehicles, which can fly – and in emergencies also land – UAVs without ground station input. The objective is to provide UAVs with sufficient autonomy to avoid other aircraft and hazardous weather without using a ground-based pilot to make decisions using real-time video transmissions. The work is part of the UK-led Autonomous Systems Technology Related...

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EASA Approval for Jetstream 32 Life Extension

Posted by on Nov 16, 2012 in Jetstream 32 | 0 comments

EASA Approval for Jetstream 32 Life Extension

BAE Receives EASA Approval for Jetstream 32 Life Extension Program   BAE Systems Regional Aircraft has received European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) approval for its Life Extension Program (LEP) for the 18-19 seat Jetstream 32 regional turboprop aircraft. EASA approval was granted in early October and the LEP manual is now available for those operators who wish to sign up to the program on BAE Systems’ i-Sapphire online facility. Under the LEP the airframe life limit of the aircraft will be raised from the current 45,000 landings to...

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TAWS – Terrain Awareness and Warning Systems

Posted by on Nov 8, 2012 in Jetstream 31, Jetstream 32, Jetstream 41 | 0 comments

TAWS – Terrain Awareness and Warning Systems

Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) published this Pilot’s Guide in 2009, so some of the pricing may be out of date, but the information should be solid. Terrain Awareness and Warning Systems—TAWS A Buyer’s Guide by Paul Novacek Download PDF Article Here Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) describes an accident where a completely airworthy aircraft is flown into the terrain. These accidents only occur during poor visual conditions; but other factors besides visibility usually contribute, such as a cockpit distraction,...

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J32 EP Kit – From a Pilot’s Perspective

Posted by on Nov 1, 2012 in Jetstream 32 | 1 comment

J32 EP Kit – From a Pilot’s Perspective

First, we should discuss how to tell if a J32 is equipped with an Enhanced Performance (EP) Kit or not. I’ll cover what exactly the EP Kit does in a later post. Here you can see the major visual difference in a J32 with and without the EP Kit.  When asked, Rob Follis, CFM’s most knowledgeable Jetstream pilot, told us this.From a pilot perspective the EP kit only offer the Flaps 0 takeoff option. Without going into technical reading it enhances the take off performance in high elevations and hot temps. But it requires...

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Are there life limits on the J31/J32 Airframe and Components?

Posted by on Jul 6, 2012 in F.A.Q.'s, Jetstream 31, Jetstream 32 | 0 comments

Are there life limits on the J31/J32 Airframe and Components?

The life limits on the J31/32 are:Wing: 43,000 landings Fuselage: 46,200 landings Vertical Stabilizer: 55,500 landings Horizontal Stabilizer: 45,500 landings Engine Mount Structure: 53,000 landings

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